Dasavatharam cycle stand !!

We had earlier seen the amazing pillars of Srirangam Sesharaya mandabam in many posts. Such is the wealth of sculptural mastery in this pillared hall. it caught the eye of the master artist Silpi, to so masterly capture the stone in his work. Since there were many lovely sculptures in the hall, had requested my good friend Mr. Ashok to go there in person and do a full fledged shoot in the pillared hall. But what he came back with wrenched my heart.



The majestic horse pillar, lay is such a damaged condition. The unbelievable method in which such a lovely lance was sculpted into stone, lay broken. If only the master sculptor who sculpted these beauties saw this ! below the awesomely endowed lady stood majestically holding her head up in typical tamil pride, despite all the wanton destruction around. The rest of the sculptures have all been lost in the pillar.

When did this destruction happen, since no records are available for this, i searched on the net and came up with this 1868 albumen print

(Photograph from an album of 41 albumen prints by Edmund David Lyon. Close-up of carved horses and other figures in the Sheshagirirayar Mandapa at the Ranganatha temple of Srirangam. Lyon’s ‘Notes to Accompany a Series of Photographs Prepared to Illustrate the Ancient Architecture of Southern India’, edited by James Fergusson)

Seeing the pillar damaged during that period itself gave me some respite – atleast they were not damaged during recent times. But then what i saw next made my blood boil. The Kings of our land, gave grants and etched them into stone for these magnificent edifices – of art, to be a virtual repository of art, but how are we using them – a heritage cycle stand!



These beautiful Dasavathara pillars are being scratched by the handles and pedals of the cycles. Similar is the plight of numerous rare sculptures in this hall. Srirangam is the foremost – The Temple for Vaishnavites and if this is the plight there, i don’t have words for the lesser known temples.

One look at these pillars, would delight even the least artistically inclined soul, the sculptor has poured out his heart, fed the creation from his own blood and created masterpieces, it baffles me as to why its doesnt appeal to these heartless souls. They show as much respect to these treasures as a dog would give a lamppost. Decency limits me from writing more.

Can these sculptures be restored. Do we have the intent first and secondly is there the artistic know how. Even during the pallava period, the beautiful shore temple in mallai had its main deity – the vishnu idol’s hand being broken – and the court poet Acharya Dandin writes of the pallava sculptors mastercraft that he seemlessly restored the broken arm in his immortal work – Avanisundarikatha

Maybe, some good soul who sees this post, will take it up with the ` you know who’ and give these sculptures a new lease of life, or atleast the bare respect they deserve.

Silpi – An Artist Par Excellence

We saw earlier how the the amazing pillars of Srirangam Sesharaya Mandabam inspired our friends to sketch them. But a casual conversation with one of the young artists, Mr. Prasad, sent me to look for the master artist, who forever immortalised sketching sculpture. I was delighted to see that he too sketched these amazing pillars – He is none other than Artist Silpi (1919 – 1983) – P.M. Sreenivasan.

While Prasad was languishing that he had searched everywhere to see the face of this amazing artist, i remembered our Gokul’s article in Varalaaru.com. For a wider audience i am trying to translate it into English, so that the fame of this divinely gifted artist can spread more.

Lets first see his amazing sketch of the pillars.



Temple : Srirangam Sri Ranganathaswami Temple – Trichy, Tamilnadu, India
Location : Sesharayar Mandapa
Features : The mandapa is finely sculpted with various figures. Silpi captures the essence of this complicated and delicate sculpture
Collection sent by : Prof.S.Swaminathan
Original series : Thennatuch Chelvangal
Magazine courtesy : Ananda Vikatan

Sources:
http://www.varalaaru.com/default.asp?articleid=443
http://www.varalaaru.com/default.asp?articleid=561

Article original source from Tanjore Big temple consecration commemorative edition 1997

The fame of those who are born with divine gifts never fade, so too can’t termites destroy the names of those who strive tirelessly. The noblest of intentions seek out the very pinnacle of beauty and the strive for excellence is akin to a penance. The unbent spine, the unaided eyes ( without spectacles to assist), the steadfast gaze, crowned with the essence of benevolent grace, the gifted fingers that let dance the amazing brush strokes to give life to every stroke. The gentlest of smiles breaking through, not a full fledged laugh but those lips do not part yet you know the joy radiating from the poise. The wide forehead displaying proudly the ash marks of shiva and inbetween the large vermilion mark.

These are the marks of a master artist – Silpi. No stone has been left unsketched by his mastery, in every nook and corner of tamil nadu, itself dotted with thousands of temples. He converted every home into a temple or brought the temple to the homes of the masses, by his divine creations.

He was born in Namakkal in 1919. He was named Sreenivasan. From his young age, he displayed amazing affliction to sketching, more than his studies. The National poet Sri Namakkal Ramalingam Pillai, was a renowned artist as well and seeing the gift in Sreenivasan, he advised him to join the Madras Art college in Egmore, to refine his skills.

He joined for a 6 year course, but his abundant talent led the College Principal Sri. D.P. Roy Choudry to grade him from second year to fourth year straight away. He excelled in pen and ink line sketches. His sketches caught the eye of all and sundry including Mr. Choudry. He complimented the work, keeping it on par if not higher levels of european masters.

when Sreenivasan was a student, he was inspired by artist Maali’s caricatures. Similarly, during later years, Sreenivasan;s works attracted Maali. This bond later got and kept Sreenivasan, in the employment of the tamil Magazine anantha Vikadan for 22 years.

Sreenivasan was more inclined to sketch buildings than human figures, and Mali wanting to take full advantage of this, gave him the name Silpi and commissioned him to sketch temple sculpture.

The divine stone sculptures are not only three dimensional creations, but also have a fouth dimension – the confluence of divinity. Photographs of these sculptures are but images or replicas, but inorder for the true expression of the sculpture to be brought forth, was a task which only the great master artist Silpi could do.

He could portray the divine beauty of the sculpture and capture it into his art. How and when he did it is interesting as well. He would wait for all the devotees to finish their darshan, late into the night and then he would sit facing the deity in the dull light shed by the flickering wicker lamp. Yet he could brilliantly capture the depth and texture of every chisel mark of the sculpture. Once when asked how he could do it, he said ” i only get the right mix of paints, then its the work of the deity who converges with my fingers to sketch itself. Its the work of the master of all creation, i am but a tool”

Before sketching the main deity, he would first sketch the ornaments on a separate sheet. Similarly also note down the colors of the individual gems. After that, as he completes sketching the main deity, he would draw on the ornaments and it would give him great pleasure, as though he is anointing the actual deity with the jewels. This divine bliss is what translated into his creations, which live on for us to feel everytime we see his creations. After completing his sketches, he would dutifully take it to seek the blessings of the Acharya at kaanchi ( the eldest pontiff – now no more – a true saint) – and then bring them home to do special pooja to them. Such was the reverence he had for his work.

After leaving Ananda Vikatan, Silpi’s illustrations graced the pages of Bhavans Journal, tamil magazines like Kalai Magal, Thinamani Kathir, Idayam Pesugirathu, Amuthsurabi, showcasing the beauty of South Indian temple sculpture.

Silpi had a small family, he was ably supported by his wife Mrs. Padma. A lean figure, but always smiling graceful lady, she was the goddess Annapoorani herself when it came to hospitality for her guests. However, ill health took its toll at a very young age and she departed in 1968, leaving behind a son – Maali an daughter Saradha.

For long years, Silpi never groomed a successor. However in 1981, on a January14th – a monday, the day of the harvest festival – Pongal, a young lad of 15 years came with his father to visit Silpi. His name was Giridharan.Silpi was taken aback when he saw the young boys art, complimenting him that at such an young age, even he couldnt sketch such amazing art. Such praise flowed from the masters heart.

He took him immediately as his art successor, and was overjoyed at it. He used a part of his name and his wifes and gave him a new name – Padmavaasan. mr. Padmavaasan went on to become a brilliant artist, illustrating the new editions of kalki’s immortal works of historical fiction. The divinity that flows through his works are reminiscences of Silpi.

Such a masterful artist was not aplty decorated during his lifetime. The coming generation should not forget the contributions of this great artist.

But what is the current status of this amazing pillared sesharaya mandabam…will see next

Origins of the Srirangam Vimana – story in sculpture

Today, we are going to see a very rare and unique sculpture. It gives me great pleasure to present this post, since it brings out the true essence of our blog site. We had earlier seen the amazing pillar sculptures of Sesharaya Mandabam, while i was posting about this in mintamil forum, Sir Srirangam Mohanarangan, asked me about a unique sculpture in one of those pillars. I did not have it then and hence requested my ever resourceful friend Mr. Ashok to source it for me. Being such an ardent enthusiast, Ashok made the trip and ensured that i get the correct pictures ( he did get many more – and we will see this in subsequent posts). Writing about the foremost of shrines of Vishnu and one of the most revered of holy places gives me great joy, i thank the will of God for making this possible.

Rudra expounds to Narada the origin, growth and greatness of Srirangam thus:

When God created Brahma from his navel and deputed him to create the earth the latter was at his wit’s end when he saw a sheer expanse of a water. When he was thus perplexed God came to him in the form of a swan (hamsa) and saying ‘Om’ disappeared. Then Brahma worshipped God saying ‘Om’. Once again God appeared to him as a swan and preached the Vedas, which were stolen away by the two asuras, Madhu and Kaitabha. Brahma, unable to trace them even after an elaborate search, appealed to God, who appeared to him in the form of a fish, killed the asuras in His manifestation of a horse (hayagriva) and disappeared after restoring the Vedas. Then Brahma created the universe.

He was displeased, however, with his creation, for he found that everything was transient and disappeared in course of time. He went to Ksirasagar (‘Ocean of milk’) and worshiped God, who appeared to him as a tortoise. Brahma was puzzled and prayed to God to show him His real form. Thereupon God advised him to worship Him by repeating the Astaksara or the eight-lettered mantra (Om Namo Narayanaya). Brahma, so doing, lost himself in penance and contemplation. As a result of his penance the Sriranga Vaimana sprang from the Ksirasagar radiating luster allround.5 (The expression Sriranga Vimana is used to denote the turret as well as the oval shaped sanctum beneath it, containing the image of the reclining Ranganatha. The turret, the sanctum and the image form a single whole and are inseparably associated with one another.) It was borne by Garuda. Sesa, the Serpent God, had spread his hood over it. Visvaksena, with a stick in hand, cleared the way for the God. The sun and moon were fanning the deity with chowries. Narada and Tumburu followed singing. There was the Jayaghosa of Rudra and other gods and the ‘Dundubighosa’. The celestial courtesans danced. Clouds rained flowers. There were great hurrahs and tumult.

Brahma awoke from his penance and prostrated himself before the vimana. He stood up saying the four Vedas through his four mouths and was lost in amazement. Sunanda, a celestial watch at the gate (dwarapalaka), told him that the three lettered Vimana, ‘Sri-ra-nga’ was the result of his penance, that God was resting with His consort inside and that he could see Him and worship Him. Then Brahma worshiped the Almighty for a long time. Finally the God spoke to him thus: “Listen O Brahma! I have appeared as a result of your penance.” Then he explained to him the four types of idols and vimanas, – (1) Svayamvykta – created by God, i.e., God Himself choosing to come down as an idol, (2) Divya – created by the Devas, (3) Saiddha – created by a great seers and (4) Manusya – created by mortals. “The Vimanas of the first class, viz., Svayamvyakta will appear in eight places – Srirangam, Srimusnam, Venkatadri, Saligram, Naimisaranyam, Totadri, Puskara and Badrikasrama. Rangavimana is the first and the earliest of these” Speaking of the second class of idols the God said, “I will come to Kanci as Varadaraja, where my idol will be installed by you. Ananta will instal my idol in the south, Rudra in Kandikapura, Visvakarma at Nanda, Dharma at Vrisabagiri, Asvini at Asvatirtha, Indra at Cakratirtha, etc. So also great seers will install me in certain places and men everywhere.” Then the God explained to Brahma the procedure for conducting the worship and lay down in the characteristic pose at Srirangam and kept silent.

Brahma took the vimana from Ksirasagar to his abode in Satyaloka and established it on the banks of the Vraja. He appointed Viwasvan, the sun god, to do the daily puja of the God. After Viwasvan his son Vaivasvata Manu continued the puja. Iksvaku, a son of Manu, became the king of Ayodhya and found it difficult to worship the vimana at Satyaloka. Hence he did penance, which extended over hundreds of years, and obtained the permission of Brahma to take it to Ayodhya. After Iksvaku his descendants worshiped the God. Rama gave the vimana to Vibhisana, who established it on the banks of the Kaveri.

At this stage Narada asks Rudra to give details of the above account, viz., the coming of the vimana to Srirangam. Rudra replies:

Vasista told Iksvaku, his disciple, the origin of the Sriranga Vimana and added that after being worshiped by him and his generations, it would establish itself in Srirangam and be worshiped by the Cola monarchs. As advised by his guru Iksvaku did penance near the former’s asrama with the object of bringing the vimana to Ayodhya from Satyaloka. Indra, the king of the gods knew the purpose of the penance and consulted Brahma about the possibility of their losing the vimana. Brahma went to Visnu, who told him that it was His intention to go to Ayodhya and thence to Srirangam. Then Brahma brought the vimana to Iksvaku on the back of Garuda. Iksvaku carried the vimana to Ayodhya, established it between the rivers Sarayu and Tamasa, built a shrine and organised worship.

Dasaratha, in the line of Iksvaku, performed the sacrifices of Asvamedha and Putrakamesti for which celebrations he invited monarchs of all India, one of whom was Dharmavarma, the Cola. Dharmavarma saw the Rangavimana, knew its history and wanted to have it in his country. So, when he returned home he began performing penance on the banks of the Candrapuskarani.6 (A tank in the Srirangam temple.) The risis around said to him, “Nearby lies your old city in ruins.7 (The reference is to Uraiyur, the capital of the Colas.) Rudradeva burnt it in anger. Close to it there was a risi-asram, where we had congregated under the leadership of Dalbya risi, who worshipped God. When God appeared to him, he requested Him to stay there and sanctify the place, to which the latter replied that in His avatar as Rama, He would come to that place as Ranganatha, for the sake of Vibhisana. We are expecting the Sriranga Vimana even now. Hence your penance is unnecessary”. On hearing this Dharmavarma stopped his penance and retired to Nisula.

Rama worsted Ravana in battle, crowned Vibhisana king of Lanka and performed the ‘asvamedha’ sacrifice in Ayodhya. To it all were invited including Dharmavarma. Rama presented the Rangavimana to Vibhisana out of his munificence as the latter was very much helpful to him in his fight against Ravana.

Vibhisana bore the vimana on his head and, on his way to Lanka, stopped at Srirangam and placed the vimana on the banks of the Candrapuskarani. The risis immediately informed Dharmavarma about the arrival of the vimana. The Cola king came to the spot and received Vibhisana with great delight. The latter bathed in the sacred waters of the Kaveri and worshipped the vimana. Dharmavarma also performed puja and requested Vibhisana to stay with him for a few days. To this Vibhisana did not agree and said that an utsava had to be performed in Lanka the next day. The cola replied that the festival might as well be performed in his own country and that he would meet all the expenses. Vibhisana then agreed to stay, and the festival was begun and celebrated for nine days in a grand fashion. After a stay of a fortnight Vibhisana started for Lanka. To his utter amazement and sorrow the vimana had got itself fixed to the spot where he had placed it and had become irremovable.8 (According to the popular local version Vibhisana had been instructed by Rama not to place the vimana on the ground. At Srirangam Vibhisana entrusted it to a Brahmana boy for a short while. The latter placed it on the ground as the former did not return in time, as promised. When he returned Vibhisana found the vimana on the ground and irremovable. He became angry and chased the boy, who ran up the rock on the other side of the Kaveri. He was no other than Ganesa (Uccipillaiyar). See also Parameswara Samhita (10:279-281) ) Vibhisana shed tears. The God then said to him, “This place is good, so also its king and people. I desire to stay here. You may retire to Lanka”. He also related to Vibhisana the sanctity of the river Kaveri. “Visvavasu, a Gandharva of the Vindhyas, met on the hill side a congregation of river goddesses and made his obeisance to them. Immediately a debate arose as to whom it was meant. All except Ganga and Kaveri withdrew from the contest. Both the disputants went to Brahma, who declared that Ganga was superior. Kaveri did penance as a result of which Brahma granted to her a status of equality. Still dissatisfied she is performing penance at Saraksetra. To give her the first place among the rivers I have to raise her sanctity to the utmost by remaining in her midst. I will recline here facing your country. You may go back to Lanka.”

Dharmavarma built a shrine for the vimana, the surrounding prakaras and organised worship.

Long post, but here come the pillar sculpture. You can see Vibhisana in his royal bearings – crown and staff, lovingly carrying the Srirangam Vimanam. Sadly this amazing treasure trove of sculptural beauty – the sesharaya mandabam is currently neglected and used as a …..ok, dont want to end a good post on a sad note, we see that in a subsequent post. Enjoy the sculpture for now.

The vimanam pictures ( for comment of shiv) – images are from the net

source: http://www.thiruvarangam.com/history.html

Great escape from a Crocodile’s belly

The story sculpted in this pillar from the Srirangam temple is quite unique. Have not come across similar depictions anywhere else. In order to appreciate this pillar sculpture we got to go and read the Ramayana.

Indrajit,the evil but extremely talented son of Ravana, hurls a magical missile at Laxmana ( Rama’s younger brother). He is mortally wounded and as per expert medical advise sought on the battlefield, the only cure is a rare herb Sanjeevani, that only grows off in a far off mountain. Hanuman jumps across the ocean in search and since he couldn’t identify the specific plant, he uproots the whole hill and brings it back ( refer to the comment by Kathie on the post on Narthamalai)

This story is known to most of us, but what other troubles did he encounter in this trip. This is what is portrayed in this pillar.

Having heard from his spies of Hanuman’s quest for the herb, ravana speedily dispatches one of trusted lieutenants – his uncle Kalameni, a demon to the foot hills of the hill. He disguised as a sage, welcomes Hanuman and since the mountain is very pure, requests him to go take a bath in the nearby pond. ( which is bewitched by a gargantuan crocodile). On stepping into the pond, he is swiftly swallowed by the crocodile. Hanuman uses his strength then to split the crocs belly and emerge, when Lo – the crocodile carcass disappears and there stands a beautiful maiden. She is Dhanyamaali, a heavenly nymph, who was cursed by dhaksha. Having heard all this, hanuman is red with rage that the false sanyaasi who delayed his quest, goes to him, drags him by his hair and kicks him – which launches him into high orbit and he flies and falls dead in the throne room of Ravana.



This is what is being depicted in this pillar. Look closely – to the left you see the sage ( just coming into the picture) pointing to the pond, then you move right to see hanuman emerging from the croc’s belly and then Dhanyamaali thanking him. Switch back to the left, lower panel – you see hanuman dragging the false sage and spanking him.

What an amazing piece of work, such detailing of the crocodile’s body, its feet, the majestic form of the emerging Hanuman ( remember this is part of the same series of pillars which we analyzed is so much detail earlier with regard to the horse rider – this is a similar pillar – you can see the hind legs of the horse coming into frame with its anklets etc)

There is another legend of someone emerging from the belly of a crocodile which is also depicted in sculpture, which we will see in the coming posts.

Art inspired by Sculpture

Hope you have all seen the posts on the amazing pillars of Srirangam.

Recently two new friends of mine, not related in any manner, from different corners of the globe – have amazingly sketched the same pillars.

That’s the universal appeal of sculpture, that it touches similar chords among disconnected individuals, hits a soft spot, a past memory, a vestigial umbilical chord that revitalizes a sleeping nerve and suddenly opens your eyes,fills a deeply vacant spot inside you, a longing is fulfilled, leaving you with a sense of pure joy. That my friends, is the essence of art.

Check out these sketches.

Mr Raghavendra Prasad’s
http://raga-artblog.blogspot.com/2008/09/srirangam.html
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Mr. Shriram Rajaram’s
http://album-photo.geo.fr/ap/album/6945/?pos=1&order=InsertDate
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I wish both my young friends a great future in art, and hope they come up with many more such masterpieces.

Amazing action sculpture pillars of Srirangam Temple

Today we are going to look at some unique pillars from the amazing Srirangam temple. The temple is the foremost among temples for Vaishnavites and has been the centre of the spiritual movement of Lord Vishnu ‘ The Preserver’. The temple has various legends associated it with and for viewers who are interested to read more, below site has an excellent account.

http://www.thiruvarangam.com/history.html

The temple has such has undergone many restorations and has been the beneficiary of many a generous endowment. One such later addition is the pillared hall – an artistic wonder and a treasure trove of intricate stone work.

Lets analyse just two of these splendid pillars. The entire composition of these pillars is stupendous with every inch of space covered with miniature sculptures..such intricate work on this scale and complexity..with no margin for error in the hardest stone is a living tribute to the mastery of the craftsmen. We would look at these in more detail in subsequent posts.

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The main plot in the two pillars is what we are to see in this post. Take a minute to drink in the beauty of these two pillars.

The artist has chosen two widely varying themes for these two adjacent pillars. The first one is obviously a hunting scene and shows a mounted hunter ( what a wonderful despiction of a rearing horse ..and its splaying hooves)…he is spearing a leopard ( watch the spear piercing the jaw and coming out of the side

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….a foot soldier and his assistant are shown under the rider….the foot soldier is thrusting his broad sword into the animal ( it too has been sculpted to pierce the flesh and exit in the back …the foot soldier is shown having a shield …to see more clearly you got to switch to the other side of the pillar, where another foot soldier is thrusting his sword into the leopard….what a splendid work in stone with each trust passing through and exiting the other side.

The second pillar is a puzzle

it shows well built man carrying a lady on his broad shoulders …..but surprisingly he is being stabbed from behind in his thigh…what does this depict….we need to go closer to the pillar to study this….so wait for next post….

Amazing action sculpture pillars of Srirangam Temple – Part 2

Tamil valor has been sung from time immemorial…stabbing from behind is considered to be the most demeaning act, similarly taking a hit in the back ( kind of give away that you turned and ran away from battle)…it’s a clear clue about the scene.

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Lets analyse the main characters in more detail…

The man in front is a brave tamil warrior….he sports a traditional tamil hairstyle, the dhoti and the upturned mustache…look at his ornaments…chains, ear rings and anklets…and the radiant bravery in his face inspiring generations..

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The lady on top is every more beautiful.. She carries an entire jewelery store on her, resplendent in all her glory. The minutest details being sculpted….the chains, the bangles, anklets…..a a bewitching smile to top it all.

Thus against this if we compare the back stabber (!) you can see the differentiation in the clothing…a long sleeve shirt, track pants ( his assistant too)…and the down turned mustache….maybe this depicts the sack of sri rangam during the raid of malik Kafur ( 1314 AD)

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But still not able to figure out the canopy which the lady is holding ….its got two parrots on each side,

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similar depictions have been identified as a gypsy women ….you can see a similar pillar sculpture at another locations ( sans the parrots)…

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but for a gypsy to sport such a stack of jewellary is indeed amazing, for these days they are reduced to parading bead chains … Maybe she was an imporant character…there are varying accounts of a temple dancer who sacrificed her life for to safeguard the temple during Malik’s assault….pillars do speak !! Don’t they?

Amazing action sculpture pillars of Srirangam Temple, Part 3

Well we are back to the Srirangam pillars….how did they ever manage to sculpt these into stone. To truly appreciate the beauty of this immaculate work read on…

Lets look at the horse rider and the horse itself…in a later thread we will see the amazing miniatures in the base and reverse of the pillars.

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Well, I guess the pictures say it all…look at the amount of detailing that has gone into actually sculpting each strand of hair in the horses tail…its hooves, the teeth, the stirrup, even to the extent of the tongue…

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Next the sword in the hands of the rider….since its in stone, see the masterful craftsmanship if having to rest back on the main pillar ( reminder this is in stone….)…another pillar as a short lance…( sadly the next pillar the similar weapon is broken..but shows you how the entire composition is sculpted into stone)

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In europe, there is tradition that while sculpting horse riders….if the front two legs are in the air, then the rider died at war…a marty, if one leg was only lifted he died of wounds sustained in battle…if all four legs on the ground he died a natural death…did you know?

Amazing action sculpture pillars of Srirangam Temple, conculding part

Ok, we finally come to the mazing detailing in these pillars…though small in size these miniatures are amazing specimens to the stonecraft of the artist…such grace, proporation and design..one fault would have left the entire pillar to be discarded…such was the democles sword hanging on their heads…

Just to give you an idea of their overall placement take a look at the whole pillar once again…bear in mind these are single stone and support the roof the pillared hall…

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Normally in south indian temples you would see a vast variety of mythological creatures, half beast half animal…called yaazhis…these would be of Garangutan proportions…but here they too are in miniature..down to last detail. See the sensual grace of the maiden standing coyly with a hand on her hips

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See the puppy like elephant rushing towards the Lord ( Gajendra !)

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Hanuman is in all his humbleness listening to a discourse of the Lord

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The Lord Vishnu on his elephant thone….see the lovely work on the onamental canopy on top of them.

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The Lord carried by a flying Garuda…his vehicle.

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Hanuman trying to do a la Garuda….( but see his humble grace not letting go of Vishnu’s feet!!! Truly he was a great devotee)

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The Lord seated majestically on his throne and hanuman on his feet ..praying.

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He with his consort Lakshmi

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This is a puzzle…looks like a royal coronation ceremony…you can see Hanuman and Garuda on the two sides bringing in the scared pots filled with holy water….lakshmana too in the frame..

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The churning of the Milky ocean is depicted….due paucity of space instead of showing the lord supporting the mountain as a turtle..he is shown holding it up…..but why the two monkeys…

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Next too is a puzzle… A puppy beholds the charming youth who has lovingly slung a fawn over his sholders….seems he has got a thron stuck into his feet….a lady beholds him..

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Some battle/action scenes thrown in to boot….what a treasure trove…

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